Why is this here..


A Lead Odyssey is about my hobby, collecting, painting and playing with toy soldiers. It will cover the various rulesets I use, the figures I am painting (very slowly), and some games. Thanks to Harry Pearson for the Achtung Schweinehund reference. The uniform jacket in the picture was adapted from a safari suit, the weapon is a wooden sub-machine gun made by me and my dad. Cool eh?

I play a range of scales, rules and periods.. scales are anything from 6mm, through 15mm to 28mm for little men, but I also use 1/1200 for Napoleonic Naval, and 1/3000 for Pre-Dreadnought period Naval.

My tastes are eclectic, but I have avoided most 'Fantasy' Games for a few years, as I couldn't get into the usual suspects for Fantasy Battles, and didn't have a decent group to play role-playing style games.

Saturday, 19 March 2016

WSS - Game 2

Back at the club - and the 6mm War of the Spanish Succession (Marlburian period if you want to be Anglo-centric). Again, Nick and I faced off - approximately 150 points each. As I left bases in the box, I realised that I must have had a fair bit of a points advantage in the first game, at least 15 or so, which was at least a 10% edge.

Nick was featuring as 'tired general' coming directly off a flight, so I grabbed the club terrain tiles, tried to make the terrain interesting, and gave him choice of long edge on the 150cm x 90cm table. (5 x 3 foot).

Opening
British are on the left, French on the right. The British have loaded the flank with German firelock brigades, their horse are concentrated there as well. On the British right, a small village obstructs a straight forward fight.

View from the British Right
The French have horse (well in 'Horse, Foot & Guns' - 'Pistols') massed on their left, and a lot of foot.

View from the French left
 The 'thin red line' in the distance, you can just see French dragoons and foot on the French right.

View from the British left
In front of the British you can see a sunken lane, which became a key feature.

French Left
The French left never really got into the game, struggling with enclosures and buildings.

French Centre
The French centre, lovely flags and detail by Nick. I really like the way he has varied the officers and drummers positioning to add colour and movement. I will be stealing this idea when I do my own French army.

And the engagement is on!
At the far end the German firelocks are pushing through the village on the French right, the British assault on the sunken lane is in full swing, and in the centre, Marlborough is having to reposition brigades to shore up his centre, after Blood's regiment is blown away by a close assault (the brigade routed and could not be rallied).

The French defenders of the sunken road, dragoons and firelocks..
The sunken road was backed by a wooded hill. This created real problems for the British. Their horse charged the dragoon lining the road - which we treated as an 'ELF' or linear feature that added a bonus to the defenders.  The dragoons then returned through the woods and started taking potshots at the Horse. Unable to respond the horse were withdrawn and two Irish brigades brought up to try and displace the defenders.

Crunch point
The French assault has stalled in the centre with heavy casualties from the British foot, while the defenders of the sunken lane have a problem with German firelocks turning their flank (foreground). A brigade of French dragoons entered the village to try and hold up the Germans, but were bundled ouy and forced to withdraw into the woods.

British assault the lane with infantry backed by Horse
 This became an expensive proposition for the British.

The end
Casualties in the French centre caused Villars to end the engagement while in the foreground, despite being outnumbered, the French dragoons still hold the woods as the British cavalry reform behind their screening infantry.

Overall, another cracking game. The French firelocks really struggle against the British/Dutch infantry that are superior in a firefight. The French left never really got into the game, and the French dragoons did sterling work on the French right.

Not sure what the answer is for the French. In some respects they have command advantages (they have an Army HQ as opposed to the Allies 'Command Party' so they have a much greater command radius). Massing of artillery, use of heavy artillery, and pressing all along the line, using the press forward to get into combat might even things up a bit.

8 comments:

  1. A superb looking game - wonderful terrain, great figures and an interesting contest. Thanks for taking the time to publish this report.

    I really do like those figures !

    Phil

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  2. Great looking game. Have you compared hfg with Polemos WSS rules?

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  4. Thanks guys. I did intend the figures for use with Polemos originally, but as we haven't played them yet, and were looking for a couple of quick 'pick-up' games to get the figures on the table, we stuck with a set where we were at least familiar with the basic mechanisms.

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  5. A good looking game mate ... and did I notice two units of horse gifted to the French?

    I do like the way Nick has based his mounted troops - it makes a nice alternate to the Polemos basing on your side of the table. Three ranks of infantry also looks nicely menacing.

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  6. Thanks Thomo, I agree, the 6mm looks great based en masse. Yes, two bases of 'Horse' were gifted to the French. I have now ordered a French army from Baccus, and I am shamelessly going to copy the French basing. The recommendation in HFG is that Dutch & British infantry, 'Muskets' are based in two ranks, whereas the French 'firelocks' use deeper formations. The French horse are 'pistols' so again, deep formations. I reckon they should look excellent, and I will have two matched armies when in the UK.

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  7. Looking good. Further inspiration to get my 6mm ACW armies :-)

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